February Case (Cardiovascular) Answers:

Answer 1: Anne is most likely suffering from myocardial infarction (MI), commonly called a heart attack.

Answer 2: at onset of symptoms Rosalie can be given Glyceryl Trinitrate or Aspirin to try and reduce the severity of the attack.

Answer 3: after a Myocardial infarction (In Rosalie’s case most likely a Non-ST elevated MI) patients will be started on a selection of medication to try and prevent further damage to the heart this could include, a Statin, Low dose Aspirin, an antiplatelet, a beta Blocker, and Glycerol Trinitrate when needed for angina.

January Case (Cancer) Answers:

Answer 1: The medications that are being used to treat the Lymphoma are Prednisolone, Doxorubicin, Vincristine and Cyclophosphamide.

Answer 2: The Palonosetron is a strong antiemetic to prevent nausea and vomiting. The Pegfilgrastim is used to reduce neutropenia. Metoclopramide is used for breakthrough nausea and vomiting. The docusate and sennosides, are laxatives.

Answer 3: Some of the most noticeable ones have already been mentioned, nausea and vomiting, neutropenia, and constipation, some more examples are a red-orange discoloration of the urine, there is no way to manage it as it will clear on its own, but the patient should be aware of it. Oral mucositis, this can be managed with good oral hygiene, rinsing the mouth after meals, and avoiding dry food. Alopecia, there is not much that can be done to prevent it, but it is important to make the patient aware of this, so he can be prepared. Cardiac Toxicity the management is mainly through educating the patient on the risks, referring him to a cardiologist and ensuring that his lifetime exposure to the medication is below the maximum threshold.
Bonus answer: some of the tests that may be conducted are: cardiac function, hepatic function, Renal function, temperature, full blood count, urea and electrolytes, blood sugar levels, and screening for latent infections.